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Futures of Science for Policy in Europe

Futures of Science for Policy in Europe

The project explores futures of science for policy; practices and processes by which information is exchanged between knowledge actors and policymakers with the intention to produce scientifically-informed policy in Europe. We are making a deep dive into developments which are currently underway and will take us to different possible 2030s, according to events largely unpredictable and decisions bound by a number of constraints of diverse nature.


The project is one of eight foresight deep dives of the project 'European R&I foresight and public engagement for Horizon Europe' carried out by the Foresight on Demand consortium.

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OUTPUTS

Futures of Science for Policy in Europe_Scenarios and policy implications.pdf

Blog

Albert Norström

MEET THE EXPERTS

Totti Könnölä

Totti Könnölä

Foresight, Innovation & Sustainability
Leena Sarvaranta

Leena Sarvaranta

Dr
Albert Bravo-Biosca

Albert Bravo-Biosca

Matthias Weber

Matthias Weber

Rene von schomberg

Rene von schomberg

Science in an open society; research and democratic culutures
Bruna De Marchi

Bruna De Marchi

RELATED BLOGS

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Futures of Science for Policy in Europe: Scenarios and Policy Implications
Futures of Science for Policy in Europe: Scenarios and Policy Implications
In the recently published brief ‘Futures of Science for Policy in Europe: Scenarios and Policy Implications’, we explore practices and processes by which information should be exchanged between knowledge actors and policy-makers with the intention to produce scientifically informed policies in Europe. We can see an increasing prominence of science in many public debates and the increasing willingness of governments to mobilize scientific and other advice mechanisms in the context of public debate.
Leena Sarvaranta

Leena Sarvaranta

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Horizon Futures Watch Workshop 3: Future of Science for Policy in Europe
Horizon Futures Watch Workshop 3: Future of Science for Policy in Europe
This blog post summarizes the dissemination event held for the 'Futures of Science for Policy in Europe ' project.
Emma Coroler

Emma Coroler

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Reference Foresight Scenarios: Scenarios on the global standing of the EU in 2040
Reference Foresight Scenarios: Scenarios on the global standing of the EU in 2040
The Reference Foresight Scenarios report summarizes the results of a foresight process that started at the end of 2020 with the goal to develop a set of reference foresight scenarios to support policymakers. Foresight scenarios are a tool to improve strategy development and decision making in a context of turbulence, uncertainty, novelty, and ambiguity. Recent events, such as the COVID pandemic or the Russian invasion of Ukraine, made clear that being prepared for the unknown and unexpected becomes increasingly important. The reference scenarios presented in this report aim to help decision makers to increase the preparedness of their organisations under increasingly unpredictable circumstances. The scenarios are four plausible versions of how the world may look like in 2040 and what this would mean for Europe’s global standing. They are called Storms, End game, Struggling synergies, and Opposing views. They do not claim to predict or project how the future may look like but offer strategic reflections, which can serve as a compass for policymakers for navigating through unchartered territories of turbulence, uncertainty, ambiguity and novelty. These four geopolitical scenarios are called ‘Reference’ Foresight Scenarios because they represent a forward-looking framework that provides a reference for use in policymakers’ debates about potential futures. Read the report Read the blog and learn more about the process and how these scenarios can be used in future oriented policy making.  Stress-testing policy options with the scenarios The work with the reference foresight scenarios continued as a pilot process of stress-testing some policy options against a set of Reference foresight scenarios. The process was led by the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre (JRC) and applied to a specific EU policy proposal on Standard Essential Patents. The process ran during the initial stage of the impact assessment process, but it was not an official part of it. The results of this pilot helped to understand which policy options are more or less robust and how they can be made more future-proof. The process also provided rich insights into what the challenges and opportunities of this approach are, and into how stress-testing can be further incorporated into EU policymaking. The report provides an example and serve as a guide for any future process of stress-testing policy options against foresight scenarios. Read the report: Stress-testing of policy options using foresight scenarios: a pilot case

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The Prospects of Institutionalizing the Values of Openness and Mutual Responsiveness in Science and Democracy
The Prospects of Institutionalizing the Values of Openness and Mutual Responsiveness in Science and Democracy
Science can be better fostered in an open, democratic society than in other types of societies. The norm of civic participation in a ‘democracy’ is a lived ideal for citizens, just as the norm of ‘communalism’ is a lived ideal for the scientific community. Both norms presuppose the values of ‘openness’ and 'mutual responsiveness' among scientist and citizens. This highlights ‘openness’ not as a prescriptive norm but as a value of the institution of science. Simultaneously, ‘openness’ is also an institutional value of a democracy. If we primarily understand the norm of communalism as an institutional value of science, then communalism and openness becomey research virtues for the scientific community rather than prescriptive norms.  Similarly, ‘voting’ and participation in social-political decision making is considered a civic virtue in a democracy, even though the institution of democracy does not oblige individuals to vote or to participate. Therefore, we do not need to codifying these norma, which can be seen as functional for the operation of science and a democracy therefore represent institutional values. In this way, we can understand governance of the institution of science and democracy through the adoption of appropriate research virtues and civic virtues.  However, science and democracy are dependent on the extent to which scientist and citizens engage on the basis of these norms. How can we best encourage and incentivise those?

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Futures of Science for Policy in Europe
Futures of Science for Policy in Europe
The project explores futures of science for policy; practices and processes by which information is exchanged between knowledge actors and policymakers with the intention to produce scientifically-informed policy in Europe. We are making a deep dive into developments which are currently underway and will take us to different possible 2030s, according to events largely unpredictable and decisions bound by a number of constraints of diverse nature. The project is one of eight foresight deep dives of the project 'European R&I foresight and public engagement for Horizon Europe' carried out by the Foresight on Demand consortium.

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