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STI for 2050

STI for 2050

The project explores potential futures of STI directions in relation to ecosystem performance as interpreted by three perspectives of human-nature relations: protecting and restoring ecosystems, co-shaping socio-ecological systems, and caring within hybrid collectives.


Please find the final report here.


About the project


MISSION. The overarching ambition of this project is to identify and map future scientific and technological developments, which can radically improve ecosystem performance. Policy responses that could enable EU policies for STI to accelerate sustainability transitions worldwide are also explored. The main outcome is to provide reflections on the 2nd strategic plan of Horizon Europe (HE), in its broad direction to support the Sustainable Development Goals.


VISION. S&T&I FOR 2050 is driven by the deliberation for STI efforts to place ecosystem performance on par with human performance. This broadens the focus of STI to encompass multiple conceptualisations of human-nature relations and to contribute to sustainability transitions.


STRATEGY. To identify directions of STI for ecosystem performance, the foresight project maps STI trends, conducts a Delphi study, and exemplifies six case studies along the lines of three perspectives on ecosystem performance: protecting and restoring ecosystems, co-shaping socio-ecological systems, and caring within hybrid collectives.


THE TEAM:

 

The project “S&T&I FOR 2050. Science, Technology and Innovation for Ecosystem Performance – Accelerating Sustainability Transitions” is conducted on behalf of the European Commission.

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OUTPUTS

STI2050 case study - Micro-nano cosmos.pdf

Blog

Albert Norström

STI2050 case study - Soil to soul.pdf

Blog

Albert Norström

STI2050 case study - Land use futures.pdf

Blog

Albert Norström

STI2050 case study - Data as representation.pdf

Blog

Albert Norström

STI2050 case study - Law for Nature.pdf

Blog

Albert Norström

MEET THE EXPERTS

Totti Könnölä

Totti Könnölä

Foresight, Innovation & Sustainability
Klaus Kubeczko

Klaus Kubeczko

Bianca Dragomir

Bianca Dragomir

Radu Gheorghiu

Radu Gheorghiu

Dana Wasserbacher

Dana Wasserbacher

Susanna Bottaro

Susanna Bottaro

Philine Warnke

Philine Warnke

Giovanna Guiffrè

Giovanna Guiffrè

RELATED BLOGS

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FORESIGHT ON LAND AND SEA USE - Addressing the degradation of ecosystems through scenario-making
FORESIGHT ON LAND AND SEA USE - Addressing the degradation of ecosystems through scenario-making
The key to biodiversity’s preservation? Fostering collaborations between the scientific community and policymakers by using a future-oriented mindset.
Emma Coroler

Emma Coroler

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S&T&I for 2050: deep-sea mining and ecosystem performance
S&T&I for 2050: deep-sea mining and ecosystem performance
There are an estimated billions of tonnes of strategic minerals such as nickel, cobalt and copper, lying on the ocean’s floor. Technological advance, financial viability, and regulatory frameworks are slowly aligning to permit deep-sea mining (DSM). While many rejoice in these developments, a variety of actors are calling for a moratorium on the nascent industry. Most notably, the European Commission released a Joint Communication stating that not enough knowledge about the risks of DSM is available and that more research is to be conducted to make DSM sustainable[i]. With deep-sea mining closer than ever to becoming a reality on the one hand, and calls for a moratorium on the other hand, it is important to discuss future directions of Science, Technology and Innovation (STI) for a flourishing deep-sea ecosystem.
Susanna Bottaro

Susanna Bottaro

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S&T&I for 2050 Perspectives on Ecosystem Performance
S&T&I for 2050 Perspectives on Ecosystem Performance
“S&T&I for 2050” aims at broadening the focus of STI to encompass multiple conceptualisations of human-nature relations. To do this, a framework was constructed around the concept of ecosystem performance as driver of STI, instead of human performance. This places the attention on the flourishing of ecosystems that is deeply connected to human needs and wellbeing.
Klaus Kubeczko

Klaus Kubeczko

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